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Attenborough: Elephant Seals

Elephant seals gather on a breeding beach, and the beachmaster starts to fight off rival males. Amazing clip from BBC One's Life in the Freezer, with David Attenborough.

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Horizon: Who's Afraid of Designer Babies

Every parent wants their child to have the best in life. But would this extend to picking the best genes for them? To date, genetic technology has only been used to treat serious disease in children. But as ways are developed to manipulate our DNA, there are those who think that parents will inevitably want to choose their children's genes, and create 'designer babies'.


The Onion: Man with Nice Eyes Blown

Female voters can't help fawning over sexist GOP candidates, a homesick kid on a sleepover just needs to tough it the fuck out, and Neil DeGrasse Tyson lets it slip that he's been to Mars.


Civil Rights Roundtable 1963

Marlon Brando, James Baldwin, Harry Belafonte, Charlton Heston, Joseph Minklelwitz, and Sidney Poitier, talk about the Civil Rights Movement of 1963.


South Park: Easter Showdown

Stan tries to get the real story behind the decoration of eggs for Easter.

Instead he falls in with an eccentric society that guards a legendary secret.

Here Stan asks for help from Jesus, who eventually comes through.

From South Park.


Rhapsody on the Proof of Pi = 4

Vi Hart examines the troll proof that pi = 4 and goes deeper into the ideas of infinigons.

If this video were supposed to be teaching you, It'd probably have to be boring and say that in one sense of limits, ** spoiler alert ** you actually do approach a circle and a line, solving the apparent paradox by saying that the invariant of length does not hold over infinity. Luckily Vi is an artist, and this is a Rhapsody, and instead of "learning," you get to actually think, if you like.


Keith Reynolds Can't Make It Tonight

This is Keith Reynolds and today is promotion day. Having worked at the company eight years he is the most senior Junior Business Analyst in the building. He's been waiting for this day for a very long time.

Narrated by Scott Johnson

Written, Directed & Animated by Felix Massie

Soundtrack by Joe Paine


Horizon: Neanderthal

Broadcast (2003) In 1848 a strange skull was discovered on the military outpost of Gibraltar. It was undoubtedly human, but also had some of the heavy features of an ape... distinct brow ridges, and a forward projecting face. Just what was this ancient creature? And when had it lived? As more remains were discovered one thing became clear, this creature had once lived right across Europe. The remains were named Homo neanderthalensis (Neanderthal man) an ancient and primitive form of human.

The archaeological evidence revealed that the earliest Neanderthals had lived in Europe about 200,000 years ago. But then, about 30,000 years ago, they disappeared... just at the time when the first modern humans appear in Europe. The story has it that our ancestors, modern humans, spread out of Africa about 100,000 years ago with better brains and more sophisticated tools. As they spread into Neanderthal territory, they simply out-competed their primitive cousins.

But was Neanderthal really the brutish ape-man of legend, or an effective rival to our own species? And how exactly had he been driven to extinction? What could be found out about this remarkable evolution from the bones themselves? To begin the investigation a skeleton was needed, and no complete Neanderthal had ever been found.

However a reconstruction expert at The American Museum of Natural History in New York realised that it would be possible to create an entire composite skeleton from casts of partial skeletons. Gary Sawyer combined and rebuilt broken parts to create the most complete Neanderthal ever seen. This Neanderthal stood no more than 1.65m (5' 4") tall, but he had a robust and powerful build - perfect for his Ice Age environment. But would he have stood up to the cold better than modern humans?