Star Wars Documentary

Over seven hours of behind the scenes action and information, from one of our greatest science fiction sagas of all time.


The Day the Country Died: A History of Anarcho Punk, 2007

"A surge of popular interest in anarchism occurred during the 1970s in the UK following the birth of punk rock. However, while the early punk scene appropriated anarchist imagery mainly for its shock value, the band Crass expounded serious anarchist and pacifist ideas, and went on to become a notable influence in the burgeoning Anarcho-Punk movement.

Many anarcho-punks are supporters of issues such as animal rights, feminism, the anti-war movement, the antiglobalization movement, and many other social movements.

The story of the movement is told by some of the most influential performers, including; Penny Rimbaud (Crass), Colin Jerwood (Conflict), Colin & Kevin (Flux of Pink Indians) Dick Lucas (Subhumans), Zillah Minx (Rubella Ballet), Gary Buckley (Dirt), Steve Lake (Zounds), Mark Wallis (Liberty), Gee Vaucher (Crass), Dave Hyndman (Hit Parade), Rob Millar (Amebix), Rodney Relax (Alternative), Stringy & Snout (Erratics) and Gerard Evans (Flowers in the Dustbin).

The interview footage is laced with both audio and visual music performance, some extremely rare, from the main performers on the scene including - Crass / Conflict / Subhumans / Liberty / Toxic Waste / Chumbawamba / Sacrilege / Inner Terrestrials & many more."

Roy Wallace / Ian Glasper / english / 2007 / 1:32:20 min.


Let's Get Lost: The Chet Baker Documentary

This documentary about jazz trumpeter-singer Chet Baker intercuts footage from the 1950s, when he was part of West Coast Cool, and from his last years. We see the young Baker, he of the beautiful face, in California and in Italy, where he appeared in at least one movie and at least one jail cell (for drug possession). And, we see the aged Baker, detached, indifferent, his face a ruin. Includes interviews with his children and ex-wife, women companions, and musicians.


The Nomi Song

The Nomi Song is a 2004 documentary about the life of singer Klaus Nomi, written and directed by Andrew Horn. The film debuted at the Berlin International Film Festival in February 2004, where it won a Teddy Award for "Best Documentary Film."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Nomi_Song


X: The Unheard Music

X: The Unheard Music takes long, detailed, and often funny look at the Los Angeles music scene of the late '70s and '80s and focuses on the group that critics deigned the leader of the underground pack. X: The Unheard Music combines live footage of the band and interviews with the four members (as well as their friends and families) with surreal music videos and montages of newsreel footage and vintage television commercials which help to illustrate the band's uphill struggle against the music industry.


Koch Brothers Exposed, Full Documentary

Koch Brothers Exposed is a hard-hitting investigation of the 1% at its very worst. This full-length documentary film on Charles and David Koch—two of the world's richest and most powerful men—is the latest from acclaimed director Robert Greenwald (Wal-Mart: the High Cost of Low Price, Outfoxed, Rethink Afghanistan). The billionaire brothers bankroll a vast network of organizations that work to undermine the interests of the 99% on issues ranging from Social Security to the environment to civil rights. This film uncovers the Kochs' corruption—and points the way to how Americans can reclaim their democracy.


Made by Hand: The Bike Maker

Made by Hand is a new short film series celebrating the people who make things by handsustainably, locally, and with a love for their craft.

Our fifth film turns to bike maker Ezra Caldwell (Fast Boy Cycles), who was diagnosed with cancer in 2008. When the cancer threatens to shatter his love of bikes, Ezra survives by documenting his illness as thoroughly as his craft.


David Attenborough: Origin of Life, Conquest HD | BBC Documentary | Animals & Nature

In search of the earliest animals

In more than fifty years of broadcasting, Sir David Attenborough has travelled the globe to document the living world in all its wonder. Now, in the landmark series First Life, he goes back in time in search of the very first animals.

David Attenborough's First Life is told with stunning photography, state of the art visual effects and the captivating charm of the world's favourite naturalist. It was first broadcast as a two-part series in the UK on BBC Two in November 2010, and as a two-hour special by Discovery Channel in the US. It is now being shown by broadcasters around the world, including the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

The epic story of the beginning of life on Earth from the much loved and respected naturalist, writer and broadcaster, Sir David Attenborough.

Spanning billions of years, First Life reveals the extraordinary story of the evolution of the first life on Earth and how it then evolved into multicellular life, the first plant, the first animal, the first predator, the first to live on land: key moments in the development of the huge diversity of life that has lived on planet Earth.

First Life travels the world, from Canada to Australia, Morocco to Scotland, to unearth the secrets hidden in prehistoric fossils and meet the palaeontologists who have harnessed new techniques to enhance greatly our understanding of the origins of life.


Internet Archive

Archive is a documentary focused on the future of long-term digital storage, the history of the Internet and attempts to preserve its contents on a massive scale.

Part one features Brewster Kahle, founder of the Internet Archive and his colleagues Robert Miller, director of books, and Alexis Rossi, director of web collections. On a mission to create universal access to all knowledge, the Internet Archives staff have built the world's largest online library, offering 10 petabytes of archived websites, books, movies, music, and television broadcasts.

The video includes a tour of the Internet Archives headquarters in San Francisco, the book scanning center, and the book storage facilities in Richmond, California.

Directed by Jonathan Minard

Cinematography by John Behrens, Alexander Porter, and Fearghal O'dea

Produced at the Internet Archive on October 22-26, during the Books in Browsers Conference and 10 Petabyte Celebration.

Project supported by Eyebeam


The World According to Monsanto

There's nothing they are leaving untouched: the mustard, the okra, the bringe oil, the rice, the cauliflower. Once they have established the norm: that seed can be owned as their property, royalties can be collected. We will depend on them for every seed we grow of every crop we grow. If they control seed, they control food, they know it -- it's strategic. It's more powerful than bombs. It's more powerful than guns. This is the best way to control the populations of the world. The story starts in the White House, where Monsanto often got its way by exerting disproportionate influence over policymakers via the "revolving door". One example is Michael Taylor, who worked for Monsanto as an attorney before being appointed as deputy commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1991. While at the FDA, the authority that deals with all US food approvals, Taylor made crucial decisions that led to the approval of GE foods and crops. Then he returned to Monsanto, becoming the company's vice president for public policy.

Thanks to these intimate links between Monsanto and government agencies, the US adopted GE foods and crops without proper testing, without consumer labeling and in spite of serious questions hanging over their safety. Not coincidentally, Monsanto supplies 90 percent of the GE seeds used by the US market. Monsanto's long arm stretched so far that, in the early nineties, the US Food and Drugs Agency even ignored warnings of their own scientists, who were cautioning that GE crops could cause negative health effects. Other tactics the company uses to stifle concerns about their products include misleading advertising, bribery and concealing scientific evidence.


"Tattooed Steiger"

Behind the scenes featurette shot in 1968 during production of the episodic science fiction film THE ILLUSTRATED MAN after a collection of short stories by author Ray Bradbury. This film gives somewhat of a look behind the exhausting task of putting the tattoo make-up on Rod Steiger's body. Aside from some glimpses of scences from the film itself there is also some rehearsal footage featuring actor Robert Drivas who plays the good natured drifter who meets Steiger's title character at a lake and actress and then-wife of Steiger, Claire Bloom. Even Ray Bradbury pays a visit to the make-up room.

Throughout the featurette you can hear bits from Jerry Goldsmith's remarkable score for the film.


Wright's Law

A Short Documentary about an Unconventional Teacher and His Inspiration.


Louis Theroux: Born Again Christians, BBC Documentary

In Dallas, Louis meets TV evangelists Marcus and Joni Lamb, and joins a group of hardline Christians called "The Family" as they visit the Deep Ellum entertainment district.

Louis Theroux's Weird Weekends is a television documentary series, in which Louis Theroux gives viewers the chance to get brief glimpses into the worlds of individuals and groups that they would not normally come into contact with or experience up close. In most cases this means interviewing people with extreme beliefs of some kind, or just generally belonging to subcultures not known to exist by most or just frowned upon. It was first shown in the United Kingdom on BBC2. In 2001, Theroux was awarded the Richard Dimbleby Award for the Best Presenter BAFTA for his work on the series.


Genetically Modified Foods in America

A genetically modified organism (GMO) is an organism whose genetic material has been altered using genetic engineering techniques. Organisms that have been genetically modified include micro-organisms such as bacteria and yeast, insects, plants, fish, and mammals. GMOs are the source of genetically modified foods, and are also widely used in scientific research and to produce goods other than food. The term GMO is very close to the technical legal term, 'living modified organism' defined in the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety, which regulates international trade in living GMOs (specifically, "any living organism that possesses a novel combination of genetic material obtained through the use of modern biotechnology").

This article focuses on what organisms have been genetically engineered, and for what purposes. The article on genetic engineering focuses on the history and methods of genetic engineering, and on applications of genetic engineering and of GMOs. Both articles cover much of the same ground but with different organizations (sorted by organism in this article; sorted by application in the other). There are separate articles on genetically modified crops, genetically modified food, regulation of the release of genetic modified organisms, and controversies.